General Purpose Gear Load Outs – Pt II

Updated at AP on 21 July 18.

Gear Layering

What is gear layering? As described in other posts here and on other sites, such as Mason Dixon Tactical, American Partisan, and WRSA, gear layering is arranging equipment in lines, layers, and levels, to achieve the same thing. It is a technique for prioritizing the carriage of the most essential gear for the specific job over gear that may still be important, but not as high on the priority list as other items. Many sources divided their levels of gear into 3 or 4 layers. DTG recommends and uses the 3 layer approach.  Why address it again?  Because it works!

A quick description:

Level 1: Gear that is essential to survival and ALWAYS on your person, even when you’re sleeping (remember, you will fight like you train, and if a SHTF situation presents itself, you no longer have the luxury of ‘total comfort’.) If all else fails and an individual loses their harness and ruck, they still will have their level one items with them to help them survive until they can reach support.

Level 2: Gear is for NPT security tasks and is on your person the significant majority of the time. Only items that are needed for conducting continuing security tasks are carried on this level with respect to the SMOLES packing concept. Following this methodology, the NPT member stays light and has the freedom of movement essential to do their job.

Level 3: Gear is comprised of sustainment items, which serves as one’s “home away from home.” Usually, this is a “patrol pack”, ruck or combination of both. Items at this level are needed for task completion while on a job, or for long term survivability in the field. If in contact with a threat, more than likely this level is shed so that the NPT member can maneuver more easily to counteract the threat. So, there is a possibility that items in this layer may be lost in contact. On the other hand, if the NPT is successful in its task, the NPT members can always retrieve their Level 3 gear.

Here are a few visual examples of gear that layered for an NPT member:

Example Level 1: Here you can see a NPT member wearing a big knife, a pistol, (and the bulge in the pocket is a survival kit).  He’s always got these on.

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Example Level 2: Here you can see a NPT team member’s Load Bearing Harness. It contains all the necessary items to conduct security tasks in a SHTF/WROL situation. The harness weighs about 25 pounds complete with all equipment.

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Example Level 3: Option 1: As you can see here, the level 3 gear is a “patrol pack” or small ruck, dedicated to sustainment items for a short trip in the field. The pack weighs about 22 lbs loaded with the items we recommend for general purpose carry.

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Example Level 3 – Option 2: And lastly we have a large ruck in combination with the small ruck as the full load out for one’s home away from home in the field. Together they weigh about 65 lbs.

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So there you have it, an overview for gear layering. It’s not a complicated concept, but it does help one prioritize their gear for the purpose it was intended. The layer concept also makes sure you have your “oh crap” tools always on hand.

In the next post we will take a look at general NPT security member kit contents in each layer.

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4 thoughts on “General Purpose Gear Load Outs – Pt II

  1. Bravo

    It is clear you have never shot at anyone or been shot at. You are sure you are always right must be the air support. Carrying all that [redacted] is a joke.

  2. Defensive Training Group Post author

    The only joke I’ve seen is your inability to offer anything to help others; you’re the kind of person we don’t expect much out of other than vitriol. Which you so aptly demonstrated.

    You’re done here.

  3. Defensive Training Group Post author

    Being that the Halftrack is a 3 day pack, that would disqualify it for me (coupled with the cost). The reason I prefer the surplus USMC Coyote FILBE system, is that it has an integrated 3 day pack that can be attached to the main pack, a hydration carrier that can be used independently, and sustainment pouches that can be hunt on the side of the main.

    Whole shootin’ match doesn’t cost much more than a multi-day Eberlestock.

    Not at shot at Eberlestock at all. They make great quality packs. At a price.

    Here’s an example of the FILBE with just about everything, in excellent shape, for $300: https://www.ebay.com/itm/USMC-FILBE-Pack-System-Incomplete-Eagle-Industries-Genuine-Military-Surplus/312607478359?hash=item48c8db9257:g:IQcAAOSwkq5c2N~X

    I have had mine for 6 years now, and have loaded it down with more weight than I can carry. As I get older, I cull the contents to where all told, it’s about 60 pounds. I have carried up to 85 pounds for 10 miles with no issues whatsoever.

    Hope this helps!

Feel free to comment! Debates are welcome, so long as they add to the discussion. Ad hominem attacks, accusations, uncontrolled vitriol, thread hijacks, personal threats, or any comment that otherwise detracts from DTG's stated mission will not be approved or posted. Repeat violators will be banned.

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